Project #1

10 Projects presents donation of baby supplies and funds to the Phayathai Babies Home in Bangkok, Thailand (January 2011)

CDO Orphanage

Pictured above is our visit to the CDO Orphanage in Siem Reap, Cambodia. In the picture you can see the supplies we were able to donate, along with some of the children at the orphanage (January 2011)

All of the goods purchased for our first project were from local markets near the orphanages we visited. By doing this we not only were able to help the orphanages, but also assist the local economy. In this picture we are with the Assistant Director of ACODO (center left) and the local shop owner (center right) where we went to purchase various goods. (January 2011)

Pictured above the 10 Projects team visits the ACODO Orphanage in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Initiative members, along with some of the children at the orphanage, are pictured with supplies that 10 Projects was able to purchase due to donations from friends and family for the project #1. (January 2011)
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Hello Everyone:

This is Lisa from the ten projects initiative. The ten projects team is starting up a blog, but bear with us because we are very new in the blogging World. To get things started I am going to post the self-narrative of our first project to give you a little bit of an understanding of what we are all about. I have published versions this narrative in my college newspaper, as well as in a journal near my hometown. So here goes:

In January 2011 I traveled with two of my close friends, Adam and Kaitlin, to parts of Thailand and Cambodia. My friend Adam had previously been to Thailand and raved about the country and its people, which drew my interest to the region. Adam, Kaitlin, and I decided that we wanted to travel to Thailand together to experience the country, and in late October 2010 we booked our plane tickets to Bangkok, Thailand.

After booking our plane tickets we decided we wanted to do something during our trip to help people. We came up with an idea called “10 Projects”, an initiative we created with a premise of doing ten separate good will projects across the globe. In order to complete the first project we felt it would be beneficial to travel to the neighboring country of Cambodia. The country of Cambodia is a unique place with a dynamic history of tragedy and poverty. During the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s, it is estimated that 1.7-2.5 million Cambodian’s died in less than a four year period. Today Cambodia remains one of the poorest countries in the world.

While doing research on the countries, we discovered the overabundance of orphans and homeless children living in Thailand and especially Cambodia. It is estimated that there are over one million destitute children in Thailand and over half a million in Cambodia.  The children live their lives on the street after losing their families or being abandoned by parents unable to care for them. The “lucky” orphans end up in overstretched orphanages, while the rest are left to beg and fend for themselves on the street. We decided that we had to do something, anything, to lend a hand to these helpless children

For the first project we decided to feed orphans in Siem Reap, Cambodia and Bangkok, Thailand using donations we received. When we traveled to Siem Reap during January 2011, we were able to find the Assisting Cambodian Orphans and Disabled Organization (ACODO) online. We traveled to the orphanage and explained to the assistant director that we wanted to buy the orphanage food and supplies. He took us to a local shop where we were able to buy 220 pounds of rice, cooking oils, and other needed supplies for around 100 dollars.

We then traveled to an orphanage called Children and Development Organization (CDO), and explained to the director that we wanted to help them buy food and supplies for their orphanage. The director and his wife then took us to different local shops and markets where we bought a variety of supplies. We were able to meet the children at both orphanages, and they were unlike any children I had been around before. The children were extremely grateful for our contributions, and they all exemplified smiles that appeared to be never ending.

At the end of our trip we traveled to Bangkok, Thailand, where we wanted to use the remaining donations we received at another orphanage. We traveled to a place called Phayathai Babies home that cared for over 200 children ages 0-5, and around 25 children that are infected with the deadly HIV virus. After speaking to one of the assistant directors, we traveled to a nearby grocery store to buy milk, baby formula, and diapers using our remaining donations.

Our next project will be taking place in the upcoming January 2012, where University student Kaitlin Enck, who was able to attend the first project, her brother Michael, and I will be traveling to Peru. We are currently working out the logistics of the next project, but as of now we will be visiting those in need near Trujillo, Peru. We are working to set up the project before our venture through a connection given to us by afriend who is from the region.

By creating “10 Projects”, we are hoping to aid some of the world’s most desperate children and their families in unique and creative ways. Over the next several years we hope to complete ten separate good will projects across the globe. It is our hope that each project will grow in scale as we gain additional help and support along our journey. Eventually we hope to complete more sustainable projects to aid the less fortunate around the globe, and inspire others by proving that ordinary people can indeed change the world.

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